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  1. Tata Steel Chess India
    During the World Chess Championship, 2018 between Magnus Carlsen and Fabiano Caruana, we saw a lot of fighting draws so…

     

    ...this article withlot of sharp positions.

     

    Tata Steel Chess India blitz tournament took place in Kolkata and Viswanathan Anand manages to won it at the end. In thetournament he tied with Hikaru Nakamura with 12.5/18 but in his finalmatch he managed towon his opponent.

     

    Anand said: "I'm really, really happy. There's something about winning an event that's just extra special.To win this tournament, and to win it at home, is amazing."

     

     

    Black to play and win

    Can you find the best move in the position which secures a significantcounter play for black?

     

     

    Praggnanandhaa, the third youngest GM in history, got a great opportunity to fight it out with the best players in the business | Photo: Amruta Mokal

     

     

    This was the first time that Vishy Anand and Praggnanandhaa faced each other in over the board play. Pragg went for an ambitious approach and attacked Vishy's king relentlessly. Anand defended with all his might! What happened next? Who won the game? Check out the game below to find out!

     

    [spvideo]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9tnLXvr6cLM[/spvideo]

     

    [pgn parameter=value...]

    [Event "Kolkata IND"]
    [Site "Kolkata IND"]
    [Date "2018.11.13"]
    [Round "6.5"]
    [White "Praggnanandhaa, R."]
    [Black "Anand, Viswanathan"]
    [Result "0-1"]
    [WhiteElo "2530"]
    [BlackElo "2773"]
    [PlyCount "98"]
    [EventDate "2018.??.??"]

    1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. a3 $5 g6 $1 {Black would
    like to put in safety his King and then tocounter attack the queen-side.} 7.
    Be2 Bg7 8. Be3 O-O 9. Qd2 b5 10. O-O-O Bb7 11. f3 Nbd7 12. h4 Ne5 $6 (12... Rc8
    $5 {Rook-c8 was a more precise move.}) 13. Bh6 Bxh6 14. Qxh6 Rc8 15. g4 (15. h5
    $5) 15... Rxc3 $1 16. bxc3 Qa5 17. Nf5 gxf5 18. gxf5 Qxc3 19. Rdg1+ Ng6 20.
    fxg6 fxg6 21. h5 Bxe4 22. fxe4 Qa1+ 23. Kd2 Nxe4+ 24. Ke3 Qc3+ 25. Bd3 Qd2+ 26.
    Kxe4 Qxh6 27. hxg6 Qf4+ 28. Kd5 h6 29. g7 Rc8 30. Ke6 d5 31. Rg6 Rc6+ 32. Kxe7
    Rxg6 (32... Qf7+ $1 33. Kd8 Rxg6 34. Bxg6 Qxg6 $19) 33. Bxg6 Kxg7 34. Bd3 Qe5+
    35. Kd7 h5 36. Rg1+ Kf6 37. Rg6+ Kf7 38. Rh6 a5 39. Kc6 b4 40. axb4 axb4 41.
    Kd7 Kg7 42. Re6 Qd4 43. Ke8 Qg4 44. Ke7 h4 45. Be2 Qg5+ 46. Kd6 h3 47. Re7+ Kf8
    48. Re5 Qf6+ 49. Kxd5 h2 0-1


    [/pgn]

     

    Final Ranking after round 18:

     

    Viswanathan Anand beats Hikaru Nakamura 1.5-0.5 in the tiebreak to claim the title.

     

    Rank

     

    Points

    Rating

    1

     Anand, Viswanathan

    12½

    2786

    2

     Nakamura, Hikaru

    12½

    2893

    3

     Aronian, Levon

    12

    2854

    4

     So, Wesley

    10

    2771

    5

     Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar

    8

    2808

    6

     Vidit, Santosh Gujrathi

    8

    2727

    7

     Harikrishna, Pentala

    8

    2706

    8

     Karjakin, Sergey

    2836

    9

     Ganguly, Surya Shekhar

    6

    2547

    10

     Praggnanandhaa R

    2366

     

     

    Grandmaster Hikaru Nakamura won the rapid part of the tournament in Kolkata. | Photo: Lennart Ootes/Tata SteelChesss India.

     

    Final Standings Rapid

     

    Rank

     

    Points

    Rating

    1

     Nakamura, Hikaru

    6

    2844

    2

     Harikrishna, Pentala

    2743

    3

     Aronian, Levon

    2802

    4

     So, Wesley

    5

    2808

    5

     Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar

    5

    2794

    6

     Karjakin, Sergey

    2792

    7

     Anand, Viswanathan

    4

    2737

    8

     Vidit, Santosh Gujrathi

    4

    2660

    9

     Nihal Sarin

    3

    2127

    10

     Ganguly, Surya Shekhar

    2608

     

     

    The official tournament page is here.

  2. Woman World Championship 2018
    This is the position from the game Kosteniuk Alexandra (RUS) against Ju Wenjun (CHN). It seems that White...

     

    ...can perform the majority attack, however, Blackhave an unexpected tactical blow here.

     

    Black to play and win material

     

    You can see the game blow.

     

    [pgn parameter=value...]

    [Event "WWCC 2018"]
    [Site "Khanty-Mansiysk, RUS"]
    [Date "2018.11.15"]
    [Round "30.1"]
    [White "Kosteniuk Alexandra (RUS)"]
    [Black "Ju Wenjun (CHN)"]
    [Result "0-1"]
    [ECO "C07"]
    [WhiteElo "2543"]
    [BlackElo "2568"]
    [PlyCount "154"]
    [EventDate "2018.??.??"]

    1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nd2 c5 4. exd5 Qxd5 5. dxc5 Qxc5 6. Ngf3 Nf6 7. Bd3 Be7 8.
    O-O Nbd7 9. a4 Qc7 10. Nb3 b6 11. a5 Bb7 12. a6 Bd5 13. Nbd4 Rd8 14. Qe2 O-O
    15. c4 Ba8 16. Nb5 Qb8 17. Nfd4 Nc5 18. Bc2 {Diagram #} Nxa6 $1 19. Be3 (19.
    Rxa6 Qb7 20. Ra1 $4 (20. Nc6 $1 Qxc6 21. f3) 20... Qxg2#) 19... Rd7 20. f3 Nb4
    21. Ba4 Bc5 22. Rad1 Rfd8 23. Qf2 Qc8 24. Nc3 Nc6 25. Nxc6 Bxc6 26. Bxc5 bxc5
    27. Rxd7 Bxd7 28. Bc2 Be8 29. Rd1 Rxd1+ 30. Bxd1 h6 31. Qe3 Qc7 32. Bc2 Qd6 33.
    Ne2 Bc6 34. Nc3 Nd7 35. b3 a5 36. Ne2 Bb7 37. Qc3 Qc7 38. Qd3 Nf6 39. Nc3 Bc6
    40. Qe3 Qd6 41. Ne2 Bd7 42. Nc3 Qd4 43. Kf2 Kf8 44. Ne2 Qxe3+ 45. Kxe3 Ke7 46.
    Nc3 Kd6 47. g3 Bc6 48. Bd1 Nd7 49. f4 f5 50. g4 Nf6 51. h3 Bg2 52. gxf5 Bxh3
    53. fxe6 Bxe6 54. Bf3 Bf5 55. Kd2 h5 56. Nb5+ Kd7 57. Nc3 h4 58. Ke3 Ke6 59.
    Bd1 g6 60. Na4 Kd6 61. Nc3 Nh5 62. Bf3 h3 63. Nd5 h2 64. Kf2 Bc2 65. Kg2 Bxb3
    66. f5 Bxc4 67. Ne3 Bf7 68. fxg6 Nf4+ 69. Kxh2 Nxg6 70. Bd1 Ke5 71. Kg3 Kd4 72.
    Kf2 Ne5 73. Nf5+ Kc3 74. Nd6 Bd5 75. Nb5+ Kd2 76. Ba4 Bc6 77. Kg3 Bxb5 0-1


    [/pgn]

  3. read more

    Report From Amazing GM Daniel King

     

    [spvideo]https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=5&v=14GvQOtB_3M[/spvideo]

     

     

     

    Press conference

     

    [spvideo]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8gHDHS2AjdA[/spvideo]

     

    Video lesson

     

    [spvideo] [/spvideo]

     

    View the game

     

    [pgn parameter=value...]

    [Event "Fide World Chess Championship"]
    [Site "?"]
    [Date "2018.11.15"]
    [Round "5"]
    [White "Caruana, Fabiano"]
    [Black "Carlsen, Magnus"]
    [Result "1/2-1/2"]
    [WhiteElo "2832"]
    [BlackElo "2835"]
    [PlyCount "67"]
    [EventDate "2018.??.??"]

    1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 g6 4. O-O Bg7 5. Re1 e5 6. b4 Nxb4 7. Bb2 a6 8. a3
    axb5 9. axb4 Rxa1 10. Bxa1 d6 11. bxc5 Ne7 12. Qe2 b4 13. Qc4 Qa5 14. cxd6 Be6
    15. Qc7 Qxc7 16. dxc7 Nc6 17. c3 Kd7 18. cxb4 Ra8 19. Bc3 Kxc7 20. d3 Kb6 21.
    Bd2 Rd8 22. Be3+ Kb5 23. Nc3+ Kxb4 24. Nd5+ Bxd5 25. exd5 Rxd5 26. Rb1+ Kc3 27.
    Rxb7 Nd8 28. Rc7+ Kxd3 29. Kf1 h5 30. h3 Ke4 31. Ng5+ Kf5 32. Nxf7 Nxf7 33.
    Rxf7+ Bf6 34. g4+ 1/2-1/2


    [/pgn]

  4. read more

    Report From Amazing GM Daniel King

     

    [spvideo]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WmX1TAeoRi8[/spvideo]

     

     

    Press conference

     

    [spvideo]https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=23&v=T2s5A5MuUt8[/spvideo]

     

    Video lesson

     

    [spvideo] [/spvideo]

     

    View the game

     

    [pgn parameter=value...]

    [Event "Fide World Chess Championship"]
    [Site "?"]
    [Date "2018.11.13"]
    [Round "4"]
    [White "Carlsen, Magnus"]
    [Black "Caruana, Fabiano"]
    [Result "1/2-1/2"]
    [WhiteElo "2835"]
    [BlackElo "2832"]
    [PlyCount "69"]
    [EventDate "2018.??.??"]

    1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. g3 d5 5. cxd5 Nxd5 6. Bg2 Bc5 7. O-O O-O 8.
    d3 Re8 9. Bd2 Nxc3 10. Bxc3 Nd4 11. b4 Bd6 12. Rb1 Nxf3+ 13. Bxf3 a6 14. a4 c6
    15. Re1 Bd7 16. e3 Qf6 17. Be4 Bf5 18. Qf3 Bxe4 19. Qxf6 gxf6 20. dxe4 b5 21.
    Red1 Bf8 22. axb5 axb5 23. Kg2 Red8 24. Rdc1 Kg7 25. Be1 Rdc8 26. Rc2 Ra4 27.
    Kf3 h5 28. Ke2 Kg6 29. h3 f5 30. exf5+ Kxf5 31. f3 Be7 32. e4+ Ke6 33. Bd2 Bd6
    34. Rbc1 Kd7 35. Rb1 1/2-1/2


    [/pgn]

  5. Game 3 – Another Bloodless Draw
    In general in this match, Black is doing OK, and this happened in this particular game 3. However, Magnus Carlsen…

     

    … that he wasn't very happyfrom the opening outcome. The Challenger change a little bit his opening moves but it didn't give him anything at all.

     

    Report From Amazing GM Daniel King

     

    [spvideo]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tC6yM0Jg1jk[/spvideo]

     

    Caruana,Fabiano (2832) - Carlsen,Magnus (2835)

    Fide World Chess Championship (3), 12.11.2018

     

    1.e4 c5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 g6 4.Bxc6 dxc6 5.d3 Bg7 6.0–0

     

     

    Players repeat the position from the game one, so for another time, we have seen Sicilian Defense on the board. Fabiano repeats the Rossolimo once more, which could be a more favorable line for Magnus because there are no heavy theory, no repetitions, and no super-sharp positions. This opening line is characterized by its complex strategic ideas. The first surprise came on6th move in which White deviates from his previous h3.

     

    6...Qc7!?

     

    The most theoretical l move here is Nf3 and after that e5. However, Magnusplay Queen to c7 in order to keep all of the options opened.

     

    7.Re1 e5 8.a3

     

    Now the center is closed and the White's a normal reaction is tocounter attack in the queen-side. In order to do that he would like to post his pawns there and open lines for his heavy pieces.

     

    8...Nf6 9.b4 0–0!

     

    Blackgive up a pawn in order to speed up his development and attack to c5afterwards. It's really hard for White try to keep this extra pawn; and for sure it will slow down his attack onQueen side.

     

    10.Nbd2 Bg4

     

    He developed all of his pieces and completes his opening tasks; however, other moves are possible in this position.

     

    11.h3 Bxf3 12.Nxf3 cxb4 13.axb4 a5

     

    The position is a little better for White thanks to his solid pawn chain and for thatreason Magnus tries to simplify it.

     

    14.bxa5 Rxa5

     

     

    15.Bd2!?

     

    It was better to capture the a5-Rook immediately in order to control that a-line and put some pressure on e5-pawn.

     

    15...Raa8 16.Qb1 Nd7

     

    This position is approximately equal and it's really hard for White to try for more. Black'squeen-site pawnslooks vulnerable; however, he can advance them easily.

     

    17.Qb4!? Rfe8 18.Bc3 b5 19.Rxa8 Rxa8 20.Ra1 Rxa1+ 21.Bxa1 Qa7 22.Bc3 Qa2 23.Qb2 Qxb2 24.Bxb2 f6

     

     

    Black managed to stop all of the play on e5-pawn. Thequeen-site pawns are even strongernow, because Black can advance them if he likes. Black's king can come more easily incenter and more specifically on d7-square. For thatreasons Black's position could be more preferable and White should be alert in order not to defend himself or squeezed in the future.

     

    25.Kf1 Kf7 26.Ke2 Nc5 27.Bc3 Ne6 28.g3 Bf8 29.Nd2

     

    29.d4!? exd4 30.Nxd4 Nxd4+ 31.Bxd4 c5 Blackhave the potential to create an outside passed pawn but this is not enough to win the game.

     

    29...Ng5 30.h4 Ne6 31.Nb3 h5

     

    This is a strong positional move in order to fix the kingside pawns in the "wrong" color. Another idea is to push the g-pawn and create the outside passed pawn in theking side.

     

    32.Bd2 Bd6 33.c3 c5 34.Be3 Ke7 35.Kd1 Kd7 36.Kc2 f5

     

    36...g5 37.f3! gxh4 38.gxh4=

     

    37.Kd1 fxe4 38.dxe4 c4 39.Nd2 Nc5 40.Bxc5! Bxc5 41.Ke2

     

    There is not a good way for Black to make progress here.

     

    41...Kc6 42.Nf1 b4 43.cxb4 Bxb4 44.Ne3 Kc5 45.f4 exf4 46.gxf4 Ba5 47.f5 gxf5 48.Nxc4!

     

    This is the final blow because Black will end with a "bad Bishop" and he would not be able to advance h5-pawn into a new Queen. 48...Kxc4 49.exf5 ½–½

     

    Press conference

     

    [spvideo]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y8RzTYxoEPA[/spvideo]

     

     

    Video lesson

     

    [spvideo]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ScG-K7jb-EI[/spvideo]

     

    View the game

     

    [pgn parameter=value...]

    [Event "Fide World Chess Championship"]
    [Site "?"]
    [Date "2018.11.12"]
    [Round "3"]
    [White "Caruana, Fabiano"]
    [Black "Carlsen, Magnus"]
    [Result "1/2-1/2"]
    [WhiteElo "2832"]
    [BlackElo "2835"]
    [Annotator "Kesaris"]
    [PlyCount "97"]
    [EventDate "2018.??.??"]

    1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 g6 4. Bxc6 dxc6 5. d3 Bg7 6. O-O {Diagram # Players
    repeat the position from the game one, so for another time, we have seen
    Sicilian Defense on the board. Fabiano repeats the Rossolimo once more, which
    could be a more favorable line for Magnus because there are no heavy theory,
    no repetitions, and no super-sharp positions. This opening line is
    characterized by its complex strategic ideas. The first surprise came on 6th
    move in which White deviates from his previous h3.} Qc7 $5 {The most theoretica
    l move here is Nf3 and after that e5. However, Magnus play Queen to c7 in
    order to keep all of the options opened.} 7. Re1 e5 8. a3 {Now the center is
    closed and the White's a normal reaction is to counter attack in the
    queen-side. In order to do that he would like to post his pawns there and open
    lines for his heavy pieces.} (8. Be3 {
    forcing Black to play b6, and only then start the minority attack} b6 9. a3 Nf6
    (9... a5 $5 10. Nbd2 Nf6 11. b4 Ng4 12. Bg5 (12. bxc5 Nxe3 13. Rxe3 b5 $5 {
    with decent chances}) 12... axb4 (12... cxb4 13. axb4 a4 14. c4 b5 {
    looks risky for Black, but the comp holds on} 15. h3 f6 16. Bh4 Nh6 17. Nb3 $5)
    13. axb4 Rxa1 14. Qxa1 cxb4 15. Qa4 O-O 16. Qxb4 c5 17. Qb2 f6 18. Bh4 Be6 $13
    {and Black can regroup his forces easily, while White's pieces on the kingside
    are stuck}) 10. b4 (10. Nbd2 $5 O-O (10... Ng4 11. Bg5 f6 12. Bh4) 11. b4 cxb4
    (11... Ng4 12. Bg5) 12. axb4 Ng4 13. Bg5 h6 14. Bh4 Nf6 $13) 10... c4 11. Nbd2
    cxd3 12. cxd3 O-O 13. Rc1 $36 {with easier play for White}) (8. b4 $2 {
    is not working:} cxb4 9. a3 bxa3 10. Bxa3 Ne7 11. Nbd2 O-O 12. Nc4 c5 $17 {
    with clear pawn up for Black}) 8... Nf6 9. b4 O-O $1 {Black give up a pawn in
    order to speed up his development and attack to c5 afterwards. It's really
    hard for White try to keep this extra pawn; and for sure it will slow down his
    attack on Queen side.} 10. Nbd2 (10. bxc5 $5 Nd7 11. Be3 (11. a4 Nxc5 12. Ba3
    b6 13. Qd2 Re8 $11 {The position is fine for Black.}) 11... f5 $1 $44) 10...
    Bg4 {He developed all of his pieces and complete his opening tasks; however,
    other moves are possible in this position.} (10... Nh5 $5) (10... Nd7 $5) 11.
    h3 Bxf3 12. Nxf3 cxb4 13. axb4 a5 {The position is a little better for White
    thanks to his solid pawn chain and for that reason Magnus tries to simplify it.
    } 14. bxa5 Rxa5 {Diagram #} 15. Bd2 $5 {It was better to capture the a5-Rook
    immediately in order to control that a-line and put some pressure on e5-pawn.}
    (15. Rxa5 $1 Qxa5 16. Bd2 Qc7 17. Qa1 $14) 15... Raa8 16. Qb1 Nd7 {This positio
    n is approximately equal and it's really hard for White to try for more.
    Black's queen-site pawns looks vulnerable, however, he can advance them easily.
    } 17. Qb4 $5 (17. Qb2 $5 b5 18. Rxa8 Rxa8 19. Ra1 Qb7) (17. Be3 $5 b5 18. Qb3
    Rfb8 19. Ra2 Rxa2 20. Qxa2 $11) 17... Rfe8 18. Bc3 b5 19. Rxa8 Rxa8 20. Ra1
    Rxa1+ 21. Bxa1 Qa7 22. Bc3 Qa2 23. Qb2 Qxb2 24. Bxb2 f6 {Diagram # Black
    managed to stop all of the play on e5-pawn. The queen-site pawns are even
    stronger now, because Black can advance them if he likes. Black's king can
    come more easily in center and more specifically on d7-square. For that
    reasons Black's position could be more preferable and White should be alert in
    order not to defend himself or squeezed in the future.} 25. Kf1 Kf7 26. Ke2 Nc5
    27. Bc3 Ne6 28. g3 Bf8 29. Nd2 (29. d4 $5 exd4 30. Nxd4 Nxd4+ 31. Bxd4 c5 {
    Black have the potential to create an outside passed pawn but this is not
    enough to win the game.}) 29... Ng5 30. h4 Ne6 31. Nb3 h5 {This is a strong
    positional move in order to fix the kingside pawns in the "wrong" color.
    Another idea is to push the g-pawn and create the outside passed pawn in the
    king side.} 32. Bd2 Bd6 33. c3 c5 34. Be3 Ke7 35. Kd1 Kd7 36. Kc2 f5 (36... g5
    37. f3 $1 gxh4 38. gxh4 $11) 37. Kd1 fxe4 38. dxe4 c4 39. Nd2 Nc5 40. Bxc5 $1
    Bxc5 41. Ke2 {There is not a good way for Black to make progress here.} Kc6 42.
    Nf1 b4 43. cxb4 Bxb4 44. Ne3 Kc5 45. f4 exf4 46. gxf4 Ba5 47. f5 gxf5 48. Nxc4
    $1 {This is the final blow because Black will end with a "bad Bishop" and he
    would not be able to advance h5-pawn into a new Queen.} Kxc4 49. exf5 1/2-1/2


    [/pgn]

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  • Tata Steel Chess India
    During the World Chess Championship, 2018 between…
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    This is the position from the game…

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