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  1. RCA Year Offers
    We have extended the 40% discount on all RCA courses and packages until December 31st included. Please use the coupon…

     

    … “xmas”. And also, the 60% discount on your second purchase (which will be provided by our Support Team) has been extended to January 4th.

     

    We have decided to end the year 2018 and start the New Year 2019 with a bang – we’ve decided to create a course about one of the most popular, if not the most, chess players – Mikhail Tal! He had a daring style of play, which was very intimidating for those who played against him. 

     

    Why a course about Tal?

    What to expect from this course?

    2 Best games of Tal

     

    Find them all here!

  2. Game 7 – No Breakthrough This Time
    In the second part of the match and more specifically in game, players changed the colors; Magnus had the…

     

    … White pieces again, as he had in game 6. This was a big moment, a big chance, to open the score.

     

    World Chess Champion starts the game with 1.d4, for second time in the match, and the Queen's Gambit Declined appears on the board. Very fast the game becomes symmetrically because the c and d pawns exchanged as many of the pieces.

     

    The only asymmetry in the position was the Knight against the bishop. Caruana manages to equalize the game easily and get a comfortable half point.

     

    An interesting statistic is that everyone who manages to open the score in previous matches finally lost it; as it happened on Kasparov - Anand 1995, Anand - Gelfand 2012, and Carlsen - Karjakin 2016.

     

    Another point is that in the previews match, Carlsen was behind in score with Karjakin and for that reason he would like to play very solidly and avoid to be with his back in the wall.

     

    Report From GM Daniel King

     

    [spvideo]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3RHo68RDFtU[/spvideo]

     

    (7) Carlsen Magnus (2835) – Caruana Fabiano (2832)

    Fide World Chess Championship (7), 18.11.2018

     

    1.d4 Nf6 2.Nf3 d5 3.c4 e6 4.Nc3 Be7 5.Bf4 0–0 6.e3 c5 7.dxc5 Bxc5 8.Qc2 Nc6 9.a3 Qa5 10.Nd2

     

     

    10...Qd8!?

     

    This was a surprising move and put Carlsen to deep thinking. The idea was to keep the d4 break open and avoid all the tricks with b4 or Nb3.

     

    11.Nb3 Bb6 12.Be2 Qe7 13.Bg5 dxc4 14.Nd2 Ne5

     

     

    15.0–0

     

    This is a very safe move; and after that the position pretty balanced.

     

    15.Nce4!? Magnus said it was his main chance to play dynamically. 15...Bd7 16.Qc3 Nxe4! 17.Nxe4 (17.Bxe7 Nxc3)17...f6! 18.Qxe5 fxg5 (18...fxe5 19.Bxe7)19.Bxc4, This is a double-edged position and Magnus didn't go for it because Black have the Bishop pair and pressure on the f-line.

     

    15.f4 This is very risky!

     

    15...Bd7 16.Bf4 Ng6 17.Bg3 Bc6 18.Nxc4 Bc7 19.Rfd1 Rfd8 20.Rxd8+ Rxd8 21.Rd1 Rxd1+ 22.Qxd1 Nd5 23.Qd4 Nxc3 24.Qxc3 Bxg3 25.hxg3 Qd7 26.Bd3 b6 27.f3 Bb7 28.Bxg6 hxg6

     

     

    Here we can see the only unbalance in the position which is Knight vs Bishop. Usually this piece coordination favorite White, because Queen can coordinate better with the Knight; however, the position is very symmetrical with pawns in the both sides of the chess board and White didn't managed to achieve anything at all.

     

    29.e4 Qc7 30.e5 Qc5+ 31.Kh2 Ba6 32.Nd6 Qxc3 33.bxc3 f6 34.f4 Kf8 35.Kg1 Ke7 36.Kf2 Kd7 37.Ke3 Bf1 38.Kf2 Ba6 39.Ke3 Bf1 40.Kf2 ½–½

     

    Wada Lupe

     

     

    Lupe's picture was very successful; present both players fighting for wooden weapons. None of them was in position to fight or put real pressure to his opponent; mainly because he doesn't like to take any risks.

     

    Press conference

     

    [spvideo]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6x3syMb_ByQ[/spvideo]

     

    Video lesson

     

    [spvideo]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hvs7qbfu_Rc[/spvideo]

     

    View the game

     

    [pgn parameter=value...]

    [Event "Fide World Chess Championship"]
    [Site "?"]
    [Date "2018.11.18"]
    [Round "7"]
    [White "Carlsen, Magnus"]
    [Black "Caruana, Fabiano"]
    [Result "1/2-1/2"]
    [WhiteElo "2835"]
    [BlackElo "2832"]
    [Annotator "Kesaris"]
    [PlyCount "79"]
    [EventDate "2018.??.??"]

    1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 d5 3. c4 e6 4. Nc3 Be7 5. Bf4 O-O 6. e3 c5 7. dxc5 Bxc5 8. Qc2
    Nc6 9. a3 Qa5 10. Nd2 {Diagram # 7.2} Qd8 $5 {This was a surprising move and
    put Carlsen to deep thinking. The idea was to keep the d4 break open and avoid
    all the tricks with b4 or Nb3.} (10... Be7 $5) 11. Nb3 Bb6 12. Be2 Qe7 13. Bg5
    dxc4 14. Nd2 Ne5 {Diagram # 7.3} 15. O-O {
    This is a very safe move; and after that the position pretty balanced.} (15.
    Nce4 $5 {Magnus said it was his main chance to play dynamically.} Bd7 16. Qc3
    Nxe4 $1 17. Nxe4 (17. Bxe7 Nxc3) 17... f6 $1 18. Qxe5 fxg5 (18... fxe5 19. Bxe7
    ) 19. Bxc4 $132 {This is a double-edged position and Magnus didn't go for it
    because Black have the Bishop pair and pressure on the f-line.}) (15. f4 {
    This is very risky!}) 15... Bd7 16. Bf4 Ng6 17. Bg3 Bc6 18. Nxc4 Bc7 19. Rfd1
    Rfd8 20. Rxd8+ Rxd8 21. Rd1 Rxd1+ 22. Qxd1 Nd5 23. Qd4 Nxc3 24. Qxc3 Bxg3 25.
    hxg3 Qd7 26. Bd3 b6 27. f3 Bb7 28. Bxg6 hxg6 {Diagram # 7.4    Here we can see
    the only unbalance in the position which is Knight vs Bishop. Usually this
    piece coordination favorite White, because Queen can coordinate better with
    the Knight; however, the position is very symmetrical with pawns in the both
    sides of the chess board and White didn't managed to achieve anything at all.}
    29. e4 Qc7 30. e5 Qc5+ 31. Kh2 Ba6 32. Nd6 Qxc3 33. bxc3 f6 34. f4 Kf8 35. Kg1
    Ke7 36. Kf2 Kd7 37. Ke3 Bf1 38. Kf2 Ba6 39. Ke3 Bf1 40. Kf2 1/2-1/2


    [/pgn]

     

     

  3. Game 6 – A Fighting Draw
    Many years passed since an American has won a game in World Championship Match; I'm referring to the fantastic player…

     

    … GM Robert Fisher who managed one Boris Spassky at 1972.

     

    For the first time in the match Magnus opened to the game with the move 1.e4. He didn't succeed to create any real chances in the opening and the challenger managed to equal easily.

     

    He tried to complicate the game afterwards however when you're trying to win your taking risks. Your opponents may take advantage of these risks and you may lose the game!

     

    It was almost impossible to find 68...Bh4! and after that 70...Ng1!! which traps his own Knight in order to create zugzwang.

     

     

    "I am not going to disagree with the computers, I just don't understand it," Carlsen said after being informed that 68...Bh4 was winning.

     

    Report From GM Daniel King

     

    [spvideo]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=50_gFvpt33E[/spvideo]

     

    (6) Magnus,Carlsen (2835) - Fabiano,Caruana (2832) [C42]

    Fide World Chess Championship London (6), 09.11.2018

     

    1.e4

     

    This is the first time in the match which Magnus Carlsen played 1.e4. He wants to challenge his opponent opening preparation, however Caruana was extremely prepared in all of the lines and he managed to equalize the game without any real problems.

     

    1...e5 2.Nf3 Nf6 3.Nxe5 d6 4.Nd3!?

     

    This is a weird move. Probably Carlsen would like to avoid the heavy theoretical discussion and to surprise his opponent in the opening. Similalry he doesn’t like to double his c-pawns. During the whole match we can see that he played very solidly and he didn't like to give any real opportunity to his opponent to take any kind of advantage.

     

    4...Nxe4 5.Qe2 Qe7 6.Nf4 Nc6 7.Nd5 Nd4 8.Nxe7

     

     

    8...Nxe2

     

    This is a funny moment in which 3 Knights are sitting on the e-line.

     

    9.Nd5 Nd4 10.Na3 Ne6 11.f3 N4c5 12.d4 Nd7 13.c3

     

    White won some tempi and drive back the Knight to d7. He has more space and a safe location for King on f2. Black will kick out the d5-Knight and the position is approximately equal at this point. In the light of that, we can claim that the Black managed to equalize the game at the opening.

     

    13...c6 14.Nf4 Nb6 15.Bd3 d5 16.Nc2 Bd6 17.Nxe6 Bxe6 18.Kf2 h5 19.h4 Nc8 20.Ne3 Ne7 21.g3 c5 22.Bc2

     

    White should press the d5-weakness. For that reason he starred maneuvering his pieces, however, it was better to start with the move Ng2.

     

    22...0–0 23.Rd1 Rfd8 24.Ng2 cxd4!

     

    This is the perfect moment to capture on d4, because White was threatening to capture on c5. White's idea was to create the isolated pawn on d5 and press it. For example: 24...g6 25.dxc5 Bxc5+ 26.Be3 Bxe3+ 27.Kxe3 Rac8 28.Nf4 Kf8 29.Rd2 Ke8 30.Rad1±

     

    25.cxd4 Rac8 26.Bb3 Nc6 27.Bf4 Na5 28.Rdc1 Bb4 29.Bd1 Nc4 30.b3 Na3 31.Rxc8 Rxc8 32.Rc1 Nb5 33.Rxc8+ Bxc8

     

    A lot of pieces was exchanged by this point and the draw seems to be near.

     

    34.Ne3 Nc3 35.Bc2 Ba3!

     

    This is a strong move and now it's so difficult for White to keep alive the a2-pawn. Similarly, he stooped the advanced a2-a4.

    35...Nxa2 36.Nxd5

     

    36.Bb8!

     

    Carlsen understood that the situation may become very critical for him and for that reason he started his counter play right now by attacking the enemy pawns.

     

    36...a6 37.f4

     

    This is another very good defensive idea in order to prevent Bishop e6 and isolate the h5-pawn.

     

    37...Bd7 38.f5 Bc6 39.Bd1 Bb2

     

    39...Nxd1+!? 40.Nxd1³ Blackhave the bishop pair and they can press for a while but it's hard to imagine that he can get anything real from this position, I mean to bring home the full point.

     

    40.Bxh5 Ne4+ 41.Kg2 Bxd4 42.Bf4 Bc5 43.Bf3 Nd2

     

     

    44.Bxd5!

     

    This is the best practical decision. Carlsen show his fighting spirit and that he would like to play for win as well.

     

    44.Nd1!? White can defend himself passively; however, he should find the very difficult the moves in the game and took a critical decision. 44...Nxf3 45.Kxf3 d4+ 46.Ke2 Be4 47.g4 Bb1 48.Kd2! White does manage to protect all of his pawns and he would like to re-maneuver his Knight on d3. However, as you can see, Black's position is fantastic and very pleasant to play with. 48...Bb4+ (48...Bxa2? 49.Kc2±)49.Kc1 Bd3 50.Nf2 Be2µ It might not be losing here, however, it's very difficult to suggest good moves for White.

     

    44...Bxe3 45.Bxc6 Bxf4 46.Bxb7 Bd6 47.Bxa6 Ne4 48.g4 Ba3!

     

    This is a powerful move which Carlsen missed. Now White is a forced to give up one of his pawns.

     

    49.Bc4 Kf8 50.g5 Nc3 51.b4!

     

    Outside passed pawns are stronger in the endgame and Magnus is following the basic endgame rules. The only side which can try for win here is White despite the fact of the computer evaluation. The a2-pawn is a strong passer which Black shoulder blockade. In the other side of the board White have the majority and he can create play there as well. We can conclude that in the practical game White is not winning but Black should be very careful in order to avoid any tricks.

     

    51...Bxb4 52.Kf3 Na4 53.Bb5 Nc5 54.a4 f6 55.Kg4 Ne4!

     

    By putting pressure on c5-pawn Black managed to blockade the king-side pawn majority.

     

    56.Kh5 Be1 57.Bd3 Nd6 58.a5!

     

    White is deflecting the Knight and he tries to create the passed pawn in the king-side. This was another good practical decision.

     

    58...Bxa5 59.gxf6 gxf6 60.Kg6 Bd8

     

    White gets what he want, however, he should be extremely careful as well. If Black manage to blockade the h4-pawn, then he can rearrange his pieces and he can potentially capture both of White's pawn.

     

    61.Kh7!

     

    61.Bc2? Kg8 62.Bb1 Nb5 63.Bd3 Nd4 64.Bc4+ Kh8 65.Bd5 Ne2 66.Bc4 Nf4+ 67.Kf7 Kh7–+ You can see now that the h-pawn is blocked and Black can re-arrange his pieces and capture white's pawns. 68.Bb3 Kh6 69.Bd1 Ng2 70.h5 Nf4 71.Bf3 Nxh5–+ White cannot capture the Knight because then the endgame will be lost. If he just wait then Black can go to g5 with the king. Then with the Knight help he will win the f5-pawn as well.

     

    61...Nf7 62.Bc4 Ne5 63.Bd5 Ba5 64.h5 Bd2 65.Ba2 Nf3 66.Bd5 Nd4 67.Kg6?

     

    Magnus is still fighting for a win and for that reason he played this move. Objectively he should force the draw by moving his Bishop forward and backward.

     

    67...Bg5 68.Bc4

     

     

    68...Nf3

     

    68...Bh4!! This was the only winning move. The idea behind it is to create zugzwang; a situation in which White don't have any good moves.

     

    69.Bd5 (69.h6 Nf3! 70.h7 Ne5+ 71.Kh5 Kg7–+)69...Ne2 70.Bf3 Ng1!!

     

    In order to find the continuation Caruana should find this move as well, which is extremely difficult. As players mention in the press conference if they knew that this position was winning then they will be able to find the solution! However in the real match situation, when your clock is ticking and separate move have its own importance, it's really hard to find such continuations. It's really difficult for any level of player to trap his own pieces as Black did here with the last move, Knight to g1.

     

    71.Bd5

     

    (71.Bg4 Kg8! 72.Kh6 Bf2 73.Kg6 Bd4 74.Kh6 Be3+ 75.Kg6 Bg5‡ 76.h6 Kh8 77.h7 Bh4 78.Kh5 Be1 79.Kg6 Bc3 80.Kh6 Bd2+ 81.Kg6 Bg5‡)

     

    71...Bg5‡ 72.Kh7 Ne2! 73.Ba2 Nf4! 74.h6 Ng2 75.Bb1 Ne3 76.Kg6 Kg8 77.Bd3 Ng4 78.Bb1 Nxh6–+

     

    69.Kh7 Ne5 70.Bb3 Ng4 71.Bc4 Ne3 72.Bd3 Ng4 73.Bc4 Nh6 74.Kg6 Ke7 75.Bb3 Kd6 76.Bc2 Ke5 77.Bd3 Kf4 78.Bc2 Ng4 79.Bb3 Ne3 80.h6 Bxh6 ½–½

     

    Press conference

     

    [spvideo]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BxCT72aUKfk[/spvideo]

     

    Video lesson

     

    [spvideo]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uue2Ejec508[/spvideo]

     

     

    View the game

     

    [pgn parameter=value...]

    [Event "Fide World Chess Championship"]
    [Site "London"]
    [Date "2018.11.09"]
    [Round "6"]
    [White "Magnus, Carlsen"]
    [Black "Fabiano, Caruana"]
    [Result "1/2-1/2"]
    [ECO "C42"]
    [WhiteElo "2835"]
    [BlackElo "2832"]
    [Annotator "Kesaris"]
    [PlyCount "160"]
    [EventDate "2018.??.??"]

    1. e4 {This is the first time in the match which Magnus Carlsen played 1.e4.
    He wants to challenge his opponent opening preparation,however Caruana was
    extremely prepared in all of the lines and he managed to equalize the game
    without any real problems.} e5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. Nxe5 d6 4. Nd3 $5 {This is a weird
    move. Probably Carlsen would like to avoid the heavy theoretical discussion
    and to surprise his opponent in the opening.Similarly hedon't like to double
    his c-pawns. During the wholematch we can see that he played very solidly and
    he didn't like to give any real opportunity to his opponent to take any kind
    of advantage.} Nxe4 5. Qe2 Qe7 6. Nf4 Nc6 7. Nd5 Nd4 8. Nxe7 {Diagram # 6.2}
    Nxe2 {This is a funny moment in which 3 Knights are sittingon e-line.} 9. Nd5
    Nd4 10. Na3 (10. Nxc7+ $2 Kd8 11. Nxa8 $2 Nxc2+ 12. Kd1 Nxa1 $17) 10... Ne6 11.
    f3 N4c5 12. d4 Nd7 13. c3 {White won some tempi and drive back the Knight to
    d7. He has more space and a safe location forking on f2. Black will kick out
    the d5-Knight and the position is approximately equal at this point. In the
    light of that, we can claim that the Black managed to equalize the game at the
    opening.} c6 14. Nf4 Nb6 15. Bd3 d5 16. Nc2 Bd6 17. Nxe6 Bxe6 18. Kf2 h5 19. h4
    Nc8 20. Ne3 Ne7 21. g3 c5 22. Bc2 {White should press the d5-weakness. For
    that reason he starred maneuvering his pieces, however, it was better to start
    with the move Ng2.} (22. Ng2 $5) 22... O-O 23. Rd1 Rfd8 24. Ng2 cxd4 $1 {
    This is the perfect moment to capture ond4, because White was threatening to
    capture on c5. White's idea was to create the isolated pawn on d5 and press it.
    } ({For example:} 24... g6 25. dxc5 Bxc5+ 26. Be3 Bxe3+ 27. Kxe3 Rac8 28. Nf4
    Kf8 29. Rd2 Ke8 30. Rad1 $16) 25. cxd4 Rac8 26. Bb3 Nc6 27. Bf4 Na5 28. Rdc1
    Bb4 29. Bd1 Nc4 30. b3 Na3 31. Rxc8 Rxc8 32. Rc1 Nb5 33. Rxc8+ Bxc8 {
    A lot of pieces was exchanged by this point and the draw seems to be near.} 34.
    Ne3 Nc3 (34... Nxd4 35. Nxd5 $11) 35. Bc2 Ba3 $1 {This is a strong move and
    now it's so difficult for White to keep alive the a2-pawn. Similarly, he
    stooped the advanced a2-a4.} (35... Nxa2 36. Nxd5) 36. Bb8 $1 {Carlsenundersto
    od that the situation may become very critical for him and for that reason he
    started his counter play right now by attacking the enemy pawns.} a6 37. f4 {
    This is another very good defensive idea in order to prevent Bishop e6 and
    isolate the h5-pawn.} Bd7 38. f5 Bc6 39. Bd1 Bb2 (39... Nxd1+ $5 40. Nxd1 $15 {
    Blackhave the bishop pair and they can press for a while but it's hard to
    imagine that he can get anything real from this position, I mean to bring home
    the full point.}) 40. Bxh5 Ne4+ (40... Nxa2 $5) 41. Kg2 Bxd4 42. Bf4 Bc5 43.
    Bf3 Nd2 {Diagram # 6.3} 44. Bxd5 $1 {This is the best practical decision.
    Calsen show his fighting spirit and that he would like to play forwin as well.
    } (44. Nd1 $5 {White can defend himself passively, however, he should find the
    very difficult the moves in the game and takecritical decision.} Nxf3 45. Kxf3
    d4+ 46. Ke2 Be4 47. g4 Bb1 48. Kd2 $1 {White does manage to protect all of his
    pawns and he would like to re-maneuver his Knight on d3. However, as you can
    see, Black's position is fantastic and very pleasant to play with.} Bb4+ (48...
    Bxa2 $2 49. Kc2 $16) 49. Kc1 Bd3 50. Nf2 Be2 $17 {It might not be losing here,
    however, it's very difficult to suggest good moves for White.}) 44... Bxe3 45.
    Bxc6 Bxf4 46. Bxb7 Bd6 47. Bxa6 Ne4 48. g4 Ba3 $1 {This is a powerful move
    which Carlsen missed. Now White is a forced to give up one of his pawns.} 49.
    Bc4 Kf8 50. g5 Nc3 51. b4 $1 {Outside passed pawns are stronger in the endgame
    and Magnus is following the basic endgame rules. The only side which can try
    for win here is White despite the fact of the computer evaluation. The a2-pawn
    is a strong passer which Black shoulder blockade.In the other side of the
    board White have the majority and he can create play there as well. We can
    conclude that in the practical game White is not winning but Black should be
    very careful in order to avoid any tricks.} Bxb4 52. Kf3 Na4 53. Bb5 Nc5 54. a4
    f6 55. Kg4 Ne4 $1 {By putting pressure on c5-pawn Black managed to blockade
    the king-side pawn majority.} 56. Kh5 Be1 57. Bd3 Nd6 58. a5 $1 {White isdefle
    cting the Knight and he tries to create the passed pawn in the king-side. This
    was another good practical decision.} Bxa5 59. gxf6 gxf6 60. Kg6 Bd8 {
    White gets what hewant, however, he should be extremely careful as well. If
    Blackmanage to blockade the h4-pawn, then he can rearrange his pieces and he
    can potentially capture both of White's pawn.} 61. Kh7 $1 (61. Bc2 $2 Kg8 62.
    Bb1 Nb5 63. Bd3 Nd4 64. Bc4+ Kh8 65. Bd5 Ne2 66. Bc4 Nf4+ 67. Kf7 Kh7 $19 {
    You can see now that the h-pawn is blocked and Black can re-arrange his pieces
    and capture white's pawns.} 68. Bb3 Kh6 69. Bd1 Ng2 70. h5 Nf4 71. Bf3 Nxh5 $19
    {White cannot capture the Knight because then the endgame will be lost. If he
    justwait then Black can go to g5 with the king. Then with the Knighthelp he
    will win the f5-pawn as well.}) 61... Nf7 62. Bc4 Ne5 63. Bd5 Ba5 64. h5 Bd2
    65. Ba2 Nf3 66. Bd5 Nd4 67. Kg6 $2 {Magnus is still fighting for a win and for
    that reason he played this move. Objectively he shouldforced the draw by
    moving his Bishop forward and backward.} Bg5 68. Bc4 {Diagram #} Nf3 (68... Bh4
    $3 {This was the only winning move. The idea behind it is to create zugzwang;
    a situation in which Whitedon't have any good moves.} 69. Bd5 (69. h6 Nf3 $1
    70. h7 Ne5+ 71. Kh5 Kg7 $19) 69... Ne2 70. Bf3 Ng1 $3 {In order to find the
    continuation Caruana should find this move as well, which is extremely
    difficult. As players mention in the press conference if they knew that this
    position was winning then they will be able to find the solution! However in
    the real match situation, when your clock is ticking and separate move have
    its own importance, it's really hard to find such continuations.     It's
    really difficult for any level of player to trap his own pieces as Black did
    here with the last move, Knight to g1.} 71. Bd5 (71. Bg4 Kg8 $1 72. Kh6 Bf2 73.
    Kg6 Bd4 74. Kh6 Be3+ 75. Kg6 Bg5 $22 76. h6 Kh8 77. h7 Bh4 78. Kh5 Be1 79. Kg6
    Bc3 80. Kh6 Bd2+ 81. Kg6 Bg5 $22) 71... Bg5 $22 72. Kh7 Ne2 $1 73. Ba2 Nf4 $1
    74. h6 Ng2 75. Bb1 Ne3 76. Kg6 Kg8 77. Bd3 Ng4 78. Bb1 Nxh6 $19) 69. Kh7 Ne5
    70. Bb3 Ng4 71. Bc4 Ne3 72. Bd3 Ng4 73. Bc4 Nh6 74. Kg6 Ke7 75. Bb3 Kd6 76. Bc2
    Ke5 77. Bd3 Kf4 78. Bc2 Ng4 79. Bb3 Ne3 80. h6 Bxh6 1/2-1/2


    [/pgn]

     

    Endgame technique

     

    3 years ago I had a very similar endgame with similar pieces which I managed to win with black pieces.

     

     

    [pgn parameter=value...]

    [Event "world chess amateur"]
    [Site "?"]
    [Date "2015.04.15"]
    [Round "3"]
    [White "Reyes Mahecha, Fernando"]
    [Black "Kesaris, Evagelos"]
    [Result "0-1"]
    [ECO "B01"]
    [BlackElo "1892"]
    [Annotator "Kesaris E."]
    [PlyCount "154"]
    [EventDate "2015.04.15"]

    1. e4 d5 2. exd5 Qxd5 3. Nc3 Qd8 4. Nf3 Nf6 5. d4 a6 6. Bd3 Bg4 7. Be3 e6 8. h3
    Bxf3 9. Qxf3 c6 10. O-O Be7 11. Rad1 O-O 12. Bf4 Nbd7 13. Ne4 Nxe4 14. Qxe4 Nf6
    15. Qf3 Qd5 16. Qe2 Qxa2 17. c4 Qa5 18. Be5 Rfe8 19. Bc2 Nd7 20. Ra1 Qd8 (20...
    Qb6) 21. Qd3 g6 22. Bg3 Nf6 23. Qe3 Qb6 24. b3 Nh5 25. Bh2 c5 $2 (25... Bf6 26.
    Rad1 Rad8) 26. dxc5 Qxc5 (26... Bxc5 27. Qf3 Bd4 28. Rad1 e5 29. Be4 Re7 30.
    Rfe1 Re6 $1 31. Bxb7 Rf6) 27. Qf3 b5 28. Be4 Ra7 29. cxb5 axb5 30. Rxa7 Qxa7
    31. Bc6 Rd8 32. Bxb5 Ng7 33. Bc4 Nf5 34. Bf4 Nh4 35. Qg4 h5 ({Computer} 35...
    Rd4 36. Qg3 Nf5 37. Qf3 Bc5) 36. Qe2 Qb7 37. f3 Bc5+ 38. Kh1 Nf5 39. g4 hxg4
    40. hxg4 Nd4 41. Qd3 Qe7 (41... Nc6 42. Qe4 (42. Qc3) 42... Rd4 43. Qe3 Rxc4)
    42. Kg2 Nf5 43. Qe2 Nh4+ 44. Kg3 g5 45. Be5 Ng6 46. Rh1 (46. Rb1 Nxe5 47. Qxe5
    Bd6) 46... f6 (46... Nxe5 47. Qxe5 Bd6 48. Rh8#) 47. Bb8 (47. Bb2 Qd6+ 48. Kg2
    Nf4+ 49. Kf1 Nxe2 50. Kxe2 (50. Bxf6 Qd1+ 51. Kg2 Nf4+ 52. Kh2 Rd2+ 53. Kg3
    Rg2#) 50... Kg7) 47... Rxb8 48. Bxe6+ Kg7 49. Qe4 Qd6+ 50. f4 (50. Kg2 Qxe6 51.
    Qxe6 Nf4+ 52. Kg3 Nxe6) 50... Qxf4+ 51. Qxf4 Nxf4 52. Bc4 Rh8 53. Rxh8 Kxh8 54.
    Kf3 Kg7 55. Ke4 Kf8 56. Kf5 Ke7 57. Ke4 Bb4 58. Kf5 Bc3 59. Ke4 Kd6 60. Kf5 Kc5
    61. Ke4 Kb4 62. Kf5 Be5 63. Ke4 Ng6 64. Kf5 Ne7+ 65. Ke4 Nc6 66. Bg8 Na5 67.
    Bf7 Nxb3 68. Bg8 Nd4 69. Bf7 (69. Kd3) 69... Kc3 70. Be8 Kd2 71. Bd7 Ke2 72.
    Bc8 Kf2 73. Bd7 Kg3 74. Bc8 Ne2 75. Bd7 Nf4 76. Bc8 Nh3 77. Bd7 Nf2+ 0-1


    [/pgn]

     

  4. Tata Steel Chess India
    During the World Chess Championship, 2018 between Magnus Carlsen and Fabiano Caruana, we saw a lot of fighting draws so…

     

    ...this article withlot of sharp positions.

     

    Tata Steel Chess India blitz tournament took place in Kolkata and Viswanathan Anand manages to won it at the end. In thetournament he tied with Hikaru Nakamura with 12.5/18 but in his finalmatch he managed towon his opponent.

     

    Anand said: "I'm really, really happy. There's something about winning an event that's just extra special.To win this tournament, and to win it at home, is amazing."

     

     

    Black to play and win

    Can you find the best move in the position which secures a significantcounter play for black?

     

     

    Praggnanandhaa, the third youngest GM in history, got a great opportunity to fight it out with the best players in the business | Photo: Amruta Mokal

     

     

    This was the first time that Vishy Anand and Praggnanandhaa faced each other in over the board play. Pragg went for an ambitious approach and attacked Vishy's king relentlessly. Anand defended with all his might! What happened next? Who won the game? Check out the game below to find out!

     

    [spvideo]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9tnLXvr6cLM[/spvideo]

     

    [pgn parameter=value...]

    [Event "Kolkata IND"]
    [Site "Kolkata IND"]
    [Date "2018.11.13"]
    [Round "6.5"]
    [White "Praggnanandhaa, R."]
    [Black "Anand, Viswanathan"]
    [Result "0-1"]
    [WhiteElo "2530"]
    [BlackElo "2773"]
    [PlyCount "98"]
    [EventDate "2018.??.??"]

    1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. a3 $5 g6 $1 {Black would
    like to put in safety his King and then tocounter attack the queen-side.} 7.
    Be2 Bg7 8. Be3 O-O 9. Qd2 b5 10. O-O-O Bb7 11. f3 Nbd7 12. h4 Ne5 $6 (12... Rc8
    $5 {Rook-c8 was a more precise move.}) 13. Bh6 Bxh6 14. Qxh6 Rc8 15. g4 (15. h5
    $5) 15... Rxc3 $1 16. bxc3 Qa5 17. Nf5 gxf5 18. gxf5 Qxc3 19. Rdg1+ Ng6 20.
    fxg6 fxg6 21. h5 Bxe4 22. fxe4 Qa1+ 23. Kd2 Nxe4+ 24. Ke3 Qc3+ 25. Bd3 Qd2+ 26.
    Kxe4 Qxh6 27. hxg6 Qf4+ 28. Kd5 h6 29. g7 Rc8 30. Ke6 d5 31. Rg6 Rc6+ 32. Kxe7
    Rxg6 (32... Qf7+ $1 33. Kd8 Rxg6 34. Bxg6 Qxg6 $19) 33. Bxg6 Kxg7 34. Bd3 Qe5+
    35. Kd7 h5 36. Rg1+ Kf6 37. Rg6+ Kf7 38. Rh6 a5 39. Kc6 b4 40. axb4 axb4 41.
    Kd7 Kg7 42. Re6 Qd4 43. Ke8 Qg4 44. Ke7 h4 45. Be2 Qg5+ 46. Kd6 h3 47. Re7+ Kf8
    48. Re5 Qf6+ 49. Kxd5 h2 0-1


    [/pgn]

     

    Final Ranking after round 18:

     

    Viswanathan Anand beats Hikaru Nakamura 1.5-0.5 in the tiebreak to claim the title.

     

    Rank

     

    Points

    Rating

    1

     Anand, Viswanathan

    12½

    2786

    2

     Nakamura, Hikaru

    12½

    2893

    3

     Aronian, Levon

    12

    2854

    4

     So, Wesley

    10

    2771

    5

     Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar

    8

    2808

    6

     Vidit, Santosh Gujrathi

    8

    2727

    7

     Harikrishna, Pentala

    8

    2706

    8

     Karjakin, Sergey

    2836

    9

     Ganguly, Surya Shekhar

    6

    2547

    10

     Praggnanandhaa R

    2366

     

     

    Grandmaster Hikaru Nakamura won the rapid part of the tournament in Kolkata. | Photo: Lennart Ootes/Tata SteelChesss India.

     

    Final Standings Rapid

     

    Rank

     

    Points

    Rating

    1

     Nakamura, Hikaru

    6

    2844

    2

     Harikrishna, Pentala

    2743

    3

     Aronian, Levon

    2802

    4

     So, Wesley

    5

    2808

    5

     Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar

    5

    2794

    6

     Karjakin, Sergey

    2792

    7

     Anand, Viswanathan

    4

    2737

    8

     Vidit, Santosh Gujrathi

    4

    2660

    9

     Nihal Sarin

    3

    2127

    10

     Ganguly, Surya Shekhar

    2608

     

     

    The official tournament page is here.

  5. Woman World Championship 2018
    This is the position from the game Kosteniuk Alexandra (RUS) against Ju Wenjun (CHN). It seems that White...

     

    ...can perform the majority attack, however, Blackhave an unexpected tactical blow here.

     

    Black to play and win material

     

    You can see the game blow.

     

    [pgn parameter=value...]

    [Event "WWCC 2018"]
    [Site "Khanty-Mansiysk, RUS"]
    [Date "2018.11.15"]
    [Round "30.1"]
    [White "Kosteniuk Alexandra (RUS)"]
    [Black "Ju Wenjun (CHN)"]
    [Result "0-1"]
    [ECO "C07"]
    [WhiteElo "2543"]
    [BlackElo "2568"]
    [PlyCount "154"]
    [EventDate "2018.??.??"]

    1. e4 e6 2. d4 d5 3. Nd2 c5 4. exd5 Qxd5 5. dxc5 Qxc5 6. Ngf3 Nf6 7. Bd3 Be7 8.
    O-O Nbd7 9. a4 Qc7 10. Nb3 b6 11. a5 Bb7 12. a6 Bd5 13. Nbd4 Rd8 14. Qe2 O-O
    15. c4 Ba8 16. Nb5 Qb8 17. Nfd4 Nc5 18. Bc2 {Diagram #} Nxa6 $1 19. Be3 (19.
    Rxa6 Qb7 20. Ra1 $4 (20. Nc6 $1 Qxc6 21. f3) 20... Qxg2#) 19... Rd7 20. f3 Nb4
    21. Ba4 Bc5 22. Rad1 Rfd8 23. Qf2 Qc8 24. Nc3 Nc6 25. Nxc6 Bxc6 26. Bxc5 bxc5
    27. Rxd7 Bxd7 28. Bc2 Be8 29. Rd1 Rxd1+ 30. Bxd1 h6 31. Qe3 Qc7 32. Bc2 Qd6 33.
    Ne2 Bc6 34. Nc3 Nd7 35. b3 a5 36. Ne2 Bb7 37. Qc3 Qc7 38. Qd3 Nf6 39. Nc3 Bc6
    40. Qe3 Qd6 41. Ne2 Bd7 42. Nc3 Qd4 43. Kf2 Kf8 44. Ne2 Qxe3+ 45. Kxe3 Ke7 46.
    Nc3 Kd6 47. g3 Bc6 48. Bd1 Nd7 49. f4 f5 50. g4 Nf6 51. h3 Bg2 52. gxf5 Bxh3
    53. fxe6 Bxe6 54. Bf3 Bf5 55. Kd2 h5 56. Nb5+ Kd7 57. Nc3 h4 58. Ke3 Ke6 59.
    Bd1 g6 60. Na4 Kd6 61. Nc3 Nh5 62. Bf3 h3 63. Nd5 h2 64. Kf2 Bc2 65. Kg2 Bxb3
    66. f5 Bxc4 67. Ne3 Bf7 68. fxg6 Nf4+ 69. Kxh2 Nxg6 70. Bd1 Ke5 71. Kg3 Kd4 72.
    Kf2 Ne5 73. Nf5+ Kc3 74. Nd6 Bd5 75. Nb5+ Kd2 76. Ba4 Bc6 77. Kg3 Bxb5 0-1


    [/pgn]

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